Saturday, August 29, 2009

100-Year-Old Fig Preserves

The syconium of the Fig tree.Image via Wikipedia

Fig trees have been grown in West Virginia a little over 100 years ago. Many West Virginians grow figs in their yards. Some of these fig trees date back about 1899. I grow dwarf figs tree on my limited plot of land. I love figs, and fresh figs are a rarity in grocery stores. The rest of us hear about how good fig cakes are, wishing that someone could give you a gift basket full of them. Figs are mentioned in the Bible used as a sweet confection and as a medicinal poultice for boils (2 Kings 20:7). This recipe seems up-to-date with today’s use.
  • 5 pounds peeled figs
  • 5 pounds sugar
  • 1 lemon, sliced

Quarter figs; place in bowl; add sugar and lemon; let stand 2 to 3 hours to draw juice; stir occasionally to help sugar dissolve. Place in saucepan and cook to rolling boil; boil 25 to 30 minutes, stirring constantly. After foam disappears and juice has thickened somewhat, ladle into hot jars and seal. Yield not given.

Nutrition Information: (2 Tablespoons) 70 calories; 0 calories from fat; 0 grams fat; 0 grams saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 0 mg sodium; 17 g carbohydrates; 0 g fiber.

©2008. Teresa Carr. Carr Family Favorite Recipes. Skyhouse MediaWorks.

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Pickled Brussels Sprouts

The Magic Donkey celebrates his new diet and a...Image by Mukumbura via Flickr

This is a recipe handed down from my grandmother Hall who loved to keep a garden and later can vegetables and fruits for the winter. Before there was a thing called refrigeration they had root cellars. Even raw milk was kept for a few days in stone pitchers. That was the good ol’ days. She also loved the Bible and loved to quilt. The pickled Brussels sprouts recipe is one of the heirlooms past down through our families.

1-qt. Brussels sprouts

5-small onions, sliced

1-cup canola oil

1-tsp. salt

1-cup sugar

2 cloves of garlic

1-cup vinegar

Pickling spice

3 large red peppers, diced

First, wash; trim ends of Brussels sprouts stems by cutting down lengthwise.

Next, Combine all ingredients in a large kettle and cook for 5 minutes. Add enough Brussels sprouts to float on the liquid. Add 1 garlic cloves to each jar. Cook Brussels sprouts for 3 minutes. Put in hot sterilized jars and seal.

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Saturday, August 15, 2009

The Halls of Mason County (West Virginia)

American Revolutionary WarImage via Wikipedia

The Heritage of Thomas P. Hall & Malinda Henley of Franklin County, Virginia

By Teresa Carr

The family of Thomas P. Hall and Malinda Henley Hall (twin of Jubal Henley): Joseph Jubal Hall born 1832 Franklin Co., VA and died 5 Jan 1910 Mason Co. WV.; Mary Elizabeth (Hall) Slack d. 1919 Witchers Creek, Kanawha Co. WV.; Thomas P. Hall died 12 Mary 1921 Buffalo, Putnam Co. WV (death record found-copy on record); William Henry Hall died 5 Oct. 1875 Putnam Co. WV.; James Hall who resided in Ohio; Samuel I. Hall; Joel Hall.

There are other relatives seeking help with information on Henley family members - hopefully death records/obituaries if available or any other pertinent information on:

James B. Henley said to have been a longhunter married Elizabeth (Dodd) Henley

Their children:

Miriam Henley Jenkins d. 8 Aug. 1878 Carroll Co. VA
Jubal Henley d. 1870+ Fayette Co. WV and twin sister Malinda Henley born Nov. 27, 1811 in Franklin Co., VA. Malinda married Thomas P. Hall born 1805 in Virginia (see following)
Josiah Henley d. 11 Apr 1890 Carroll Co. VA
Larkin Henley after 1880 Malden, Kanawha Co. WV
Lewis Henley - 52nd VA militia - Carroll Co. VA
and Lewis Henley Fifer in the Revolutionary War VA.

James B. and Elizabeth also had a daughter Malinda a twin of Jubal's born in 1811. She married Thomas P. Hall and their family moved to Kanawha Co. (W)VA by 1840. There is another brother named Larkin who also moved to Kanawha Co. and lived near his sister. (On the 1820 census in Franklin Co. VA Elizabeth is listed as "Betsey Hendley with four male children under 10, 1 dau., under 10 (my ancestor) and her eldest dau. 10/16 (Miriam), James B. is not listed but since she had some children after 1820 - we must assume he "came home.” I will try to get the marriage record on Sarah/John in Montgomery Co. thanks for that information. I don't know where Cripple Creek is located?


Family history of Mary Whitlock:

Thomas J. Whitlock born ca. 1820 Patrick Co. VA and wife Susan Jane Snead/Sneed of Kanawha Co. WV named daughter Mary Ellen b. 28 Feb 1856 (usually names for mother or sisters). His parents are listed as Richard Whitlock married Sarah Hancock 8 Mar 1804 Patrick Co. VA - he died 31 May 1824 Patrick Co. VA and Sarah Hancock Whitlock died 1862 Malden, Kanawha Co. VA. Thomas naming a first daughter Mary is a sure sign of family connection with Mary wife of Larkin.

John Hall and Prudence Poteet Hall of Patrick Co. VA whom thought to be the parents of my Thomas P. Hall b. 1805 and married to Malinda Henley. (Larkin and Malinda's mother was a Dodd/Poteet! - my family always married cousins!!) Have sent request for research help in Patrick Co. VA. It is also a possibility that Robert and Lucy (Hodges) Hall are Thomas' parents. Thomas had a daughter Lucy Hall. It was

Larkin Henley son of James B. Henley is a brother to my ancestors Thomas P. Hall and his Larkin's sister Malinda b. 1811 and married ca. 1825 - not recorded in Franklin Co. VA so I need to check in Patrick Co. (thanks for telling me about the Whitlock's living on the Patrick/Franklin Co. Border - big help).
Thomas P. Hall and Malinda Henley Hall and 2 children are on the 1830 census in Franklin Co. VA as is her mother and three of her and Larkin's siblings. In 1840 Larkin and his brother Jubal are in Grayson Co. VA - in 1842 Larkin is in Carroll Co. VA (where his eldest sister lived) on the Personal Property Tax. I have his marriage to Mary (Polly) Whitlock as 1844 in Kanawha Co. VA. Please know that Thomas P. Hall and Malinda (Larkin's sister moved here around 1837 - whether they came with the Whitlock's I don't know for sure - nor how many other families came from Franklin Co. VA to Kanawha Co. VA together. I agree that Mary (Polly) belongs to the Whitlock family. My record has her father as unknown but her mother as Sarah. How are you related to Mary/Larkin?

No one else knew Malinda was a daughter of James B. Henley and Elizabeth "Betsey" Dodd - but she is my ancestor. If you saw the 1820 census in Franklin Co. VA you would find Betsey Hendley with 2 daughters and her sons. The daughters were Miriam and Malinda. On the 1830 Franklin Co. VA census Malinda and her husband Thomas P. Hall have 2 females under 10. Thomas P. Hall/Malinda Henley were married by 1828 in VA (haven't found the record yet). They moved to Kanawha Co. VA/WV along with her brother Larkin who married Mary (Polly) Whitlock there in 1844 (Polly's parents moved there from Franklin Co. VA also). He was a Blacksmith. In 1880 he was a border with another family. Polly seems to have died before the 1860 census there. They had 4 daughters. Thomas P. Hall and Malinda are credited with 16 children!! Malinda was a twin to Jubal Henley born in 1811. (If they had that many, there must have been some twins). She died in 1890 in Buffalo, Putnam Co. WV. Their daughter Sarah Jane is my direct ancestor. Which of the Henley children are you descended from? In spite of all my efforts I have been unable to learn who the parents are of James B. Henley. I have a researcher hired in Franklin Co. VA where he/Elizabeth married in 1804 and she has been unable to locate any records on the Henley/Hendley/Handlay families in Franklin Co. VA.

The family of John Dodd and Sarah Poteet, Franklin Co. VA and daughter Elizabeth Dodd who married James B. Henley June 1804 Franklin Co. VA

Seeking information on the children of John Hall and Prudence Poteet. James Poteet her father sold land to John's father Nathan ca. 1784 in Henry Co. VA. Two of John's brothers and some Poteets in Franklin Co. VA 1790's. My ancestor Thomas P (Poteet?) Hall born Franklin Co. VA 1804. Is he a son of John Hall and Prudence Poteet?

Malinda Henley b. 1811 Franklin Co. VA is the daughter of James B. Henley and Elizabeth Dodd who were married in Franklin Co. VA in 1804. I agree that she and Thomas P. Hall did not move into Kanawha Co. VA until 1830's. I am currently researching Thomas P. Hall family as I found him and Malinda on the 1820 census in Franklin Co. VA. The last name has been spelled several ways but I believe "Henley" is correct.

Malinda Hendley and Thomas P. Hall are my ancestors also. I believe Malinda to be Handley vs Hendley - the name was spelled both ways as well as Hanley/Henley. Further, I believe that her parents were Samuel Handley and Sarah Walker Harmon who were in Kanawha Co. (W)VA by 1820 -then Putnam Co. (W)VA where Malinda/Thomas settled by 1850 also. A John Handley/Hendley settled in Kanawha at the same time but he did not have children the correct age to be Malinda's parent - but I believe him to be Samuel's brother.

I agree, a tough family, James B. was gone more than home yet it seems home often enough to make a few children - he never shows up on a census record with any part of the family. I don't know where William Henley was born - I didn't follow the trace on him in Kanawha Co. but I can see if any record there that would help - William is on the 1860 census there at 65 a miller with second wife Sarah and her children. Also on 1860 is a Samuel 34 farmer (probably a son) . Edward 31 farmer (probably another son). I checked the Kanawha Co. Cemetery books I have - William died Apr 21, 1890 at 85 y/o 1 mo 24 days. First wife Catharine died 1857 at 59 y/o. There is a "Woods Family (Henley Family) Cemetery" in Kanawha Co. WV.
I'll see if there is an actual death record and perhaps an obituary on William that might help us. Notes in my file lit Henley's in VA Tax Payers in Henry Co. VA - that is adjacent to Franklin Co. VA - did you check there? Can you? Also William Henley was in Botetourt Co. VA in 1830 - my other ancestors from Botetourt Co. settled in Kanawha Co. about the same time. So this might be William above. I am really interested in the fact that William son of William/Mary Ann married a Miriam? James B. Henley named his eldest daughter Miriam/Mariam! Malinda Henley and Thomas P. Hall married approximately 1828 when their first daughter was born - but I have yet to find the record - probably married in a neighboring county if not NC - she was 15 or 16 years old. Will research this further. Thomas P. Hall and Malinda and their first two daughters appear on the 1830 census in Franklin Co. VA as does her mother "Betsey Hendley" with sons. So sister Miriam was also married by then.

I am also a descendant of James B. Henley - I found your listing on the Hensley genforum wherein you list William Henley as being in Franklin Co. VA personal property tax list in 1790 - and James B. m. there in 1804.

Franklin Co., Virginia Research
There was a William Henley b. VA 1795 married Catherine Davis with children Edward, William, Frances, Woodson, probably a couple more. (He moved to Kanawha Co. VA by the 1840 census - not there in 1830. He is listed with 8 young male children and 2 young female children, himself and his wife). On the 1850 census he is listed with his wife Catherine and the 4 children I listed above. She seems to have died before 2 Sept. 1859 when he married Sarah Anderson Bowman widow of John Bowman in Kanawha Co. VA. The reason I share this is that my ancestor Malinda Henley dau. of James B. Henley and Elizabeth Dodd m. Thomas P. Hall in Franklin Co. VA - they moved to Kanawha Co. VA about the same time as William Henley - Malinda's brother Larkin moved there also! I thought perhaps William and James B. were related and that is why the family moved to Kanawha Co. VA - since James B. seems to have died by then! (Elizabeth is in Carroll Co. VA with her sons at this time.) Is there any information linking them to William /Mary Ann Osborn Henley etc. that we can verify?

I last saw Fleming on the 1850 census Carroll Co. VA with his brother Lewis- Fleming was listed as 16 y/o idiot! I would like to refer you to Romona Best her e-mail is monieb2@msn.com - she is descended from James, James, Benjamin Wallace, Osa Georgie, Romona Best – I’m a freelance graphic artist and work part-time as a Medical Information Specialist. The things that helped me place Malinda Henley to James B. Henley/Elizabeth Dodd family was that Malinda named her first son Jubal, a daughter Miriam, etc. - the fact that Larkin lived four doors from Malinda in Kanawha Co. WV and next door to my ancestor Sarah Jane etc. I was putting the family together in Kanawha Co. WV - and then found my way back to Franklin Co. VA. One "clue" I have in my files that I have not followed up on was that there was a "Larkin Henley" as a Fifer in Rev. War from VA. James named a son Larkin so I thought it a clue worth noting. The Fifer's were usually very young.

Death records/obituaries on family of Thomas P. Hall and Malinda (Henley) Hall: Malinda Hall died in Putnam Co., WV at a very old age. Joseph Jubal Hall or J. J. Hall was living with his son Andrew J. Hall at the time of his death in Mason Co., WV d. 5 Jan 1910 Mason Co. WV. Jubal was married to Louisa Legg. All this information was obtained from his Civil War pension record. Mary Elizabeth (Hall) Slack d. 1919 Witchers Creek, Kanawha Co. WV. ; Thomas P. Hall d. 12 May 1921 Buffalo, Putnam Co. VA.; William Henry Hall d. 5 Oct. 1875 Putnam Co. WV.

Seeking information on the death records/obituary of Elizabeth Dodd Henley in Carroll Co. VA - lived in home of son in 1860 she was 71 y/o.

Family of John Hall and Prudence Poteet Hall in Patrick Co. VA - John is son of Nathan Hall and Ann Rowe. Nathan was a Reverend. John practiced as a lawyer in Franklin Co., VA. Believe my ancestor Thomas P. Hall to be son of John and Prudence born ca. 1805 VA married ca. 1825 to Malinda Henley - Patrick Co. VA?

Thomas P. Hall, b. 1802 in VA, father of Jubal Joseph Hall, came from Franklin Co., Va. Thomas was the son of John and Prudence Poteet Hall. John Hall is believed to be the son of Rev. Nathan Hall. John Hall lived in Franklin Co, VA and was a lawyer.

Thomas married Malinda Henley (twin brother Jubal Henley), ca. 1828, dau. Of James and Elizabeth Dodd Henley. Thomas left a will leaving land to all his children recorded in Kanawha Co., VA in 1860. The family lived near the Malden district where Thomas was employed at the salt mines in Malden.

Jubal J. Hall b. 1832 in Franklin Co, Va. married Louisa Legg father was Fortunatus “Natis” Legg, lived 3 doors down to JJ Hall. Jubal Hall was a Union soldier during the Civil War. His other brothers Thomas Hall, Jr., William, James and Samuel also served from WVA.

Andrew “Andy” J. Hall b. June 6, 1866, d. 1956 Akron, Ohio buried in St. Albans married 1st Adelaide “Addie” Bice (Bias, Byus or Byas) from Ireland. Andy married 2nd Rosetta M. Duncan, in 1900 d. Feb. 28, 1911. Son, Jubal Stanley Hall b. Nov. 30, 1900 Mason Co., WV.

Children

1. Emma “Peg” McCarty b. 1898 d. 1990 Pt. Pleasant dau. Sylvia McCarty

2. James Hall m. Baffie Lavada Hunt

Home place located on Mill Chapel at Tabner Moore Rd. and Mill Stone Rd. Apple Grove, Mason Co., WV

3. William “Bud” Hall married Beulah Palmer, Lola Higginbotham, Hilda Sapps

Children

1. Cyril William Hall b. 1921 d. 2005, age 84 Campbells Creek

2. Nancy Hall

3. Jerry Hall

4. Karen Adelaide Hall

Rosetta M. Duncan, dau. of William H. Duncan and Rebecca J. Graves. William was son of Moses Manning Duncan b. Apr. 26, 1831, son of John Joshua Murphy Duncan, b.1808 Buckingham Co., VA and Betheline Manning (d. 1835). After Betheline’s death Josh married 2nd Mahala Forrest m. 1835. Moses Manning Duncan married Martha S. Persinger, daughter of Alexander and Martha Patsy (Mayes) Persinger, Mason Co., Va (WV).

Hall Related Names:

  • Byus
  • Duncan
  • Graves
  • Blankenship
  • Legg
  • Henley
  • Dodd
  • Poteet

Seeking information and hopefully death records/obituaries on family of Thomas P. Hall and Malinda Henley Hall (twin of Jubal Henley): Joseph Jubal Hall born 1832 Franklin Co., VA and died 5 Jan 1910 Mason Co. WV. Mary E. Hall Slack d. 1919 Witchers Creek, Kanawha Co. WV. Thomas P. Hall died 12 May 1921 Buffalo, Putnam Co. WV (death record found-copy on record). William Henry Hall died 5 Oct. 1875 Putnam Co. WV.

Information on Henley family members - death records/obituaries if available or any other pertinent information on:
Miriam Henley Jenkins d. 8 Aug. 1878 Carroll Co. VA
Jubal Henley d. 1870+ Fayette Co. WV
Josiah Henley d. 11 Apr 1890 Carroll Co. VA
Larkin Henley after 1880 Malden, Kanawha Co. WV
Lewis Henley - 52nd VA militia - Carroll Co. VA
Lewis Henley Fifer in the Revolutionary War VA.

James B. and Elizabeth also had a daughter Malinda a twin of Jubal's born in 1811. She married Thomas P. Hall and their family moved to Kanawha Co. (W)VA by 1840. There is another brother named Larkin who also moved to Kanawha Co. and lived near his sister. (On the 1820 census in Franklin Co. VA Elizabeth is listed as "Betsey Hendley with four male children under 10, 1 dau., under 10 (my ancestor) and her eldest dau. 10/16 (Miriam), James B. is not listed but since she had some children after 1820 - we must assume he "came home". I will try to get the marriage record on Sarah/John in Montgomery Co. thanks for that information. I don't know where Cripple Creek is located ?


Thomas J. Whitlock born ca. 1820 Patrick Co. VA and wife Susan Jane Snead/Sneed of Kanawha Co. WV named daughter Mary Ellen b. 28 Feb 1856 (usually names for mother or sisters). His parents are listed as Richard Whitlock married Sarah Hancock 8 Mar 1804 Patrick Co. VA - he died 31 May 1824 Patrick Co. VA and Sarah Hancock Whitlock died 1862 Malden, Kanawha Co. VA.

I think that Thomas naming a first daughter Mary is a sure sign of family connection with Mary Whitlock wife of Larkin Henley.

I am researching John Hall and Prudence Poteet Hall of Patrick Co. VA whom I believe to be the parents of my Thomas P. Hall b. 1805 and married to Malinda Henley. (Larkin and Malinda's mother was a Dodd/Poteet! - my family always married cousins!!) Have sent request for research help in Patrick Co. VA.


Larkin Henley son of James B. Henley is a brother to my ancestors Thomas P. Hall and his Larkin's sister Malinda b. 1811 and married ca. 1825 - not recorded in Franklin Co. VA so I need to check in Patrick Co. (thanks for telling me about the Whitlock's living on the Patrick/Franklin Co. Border - big help).
Thomas P. Hall and Malinda Henley Hall and 2 children are on the 1830 census in Franklin Co. VA as is her mother and three of her and Larkin's siblings. In 1840 Larkin and his brother Jubal are in Grayson Co. VA - in 1842 Larkin is in Carroll Co. VA (where his eldest sister lived) on the Personal Property Tax. I have his marriage to Mary (Polly) Whitlock as 1844 in Kanawha Co. VA. Please know that Thomas P. Hall and Malinda (Larkin's sister moved here around 1837 - whether they came with the Whitlock's I don't know for sure - nor how many other families came from Franklin Co. VA to Kanawha Co. VA together. I agree that Mary (Polly) belongs to the Whitlock family. My record has her father as unknown but her mother as Sarah. How are you related to Mary/Larkin?

Malinda (Henley) Hall was a daughter of James B. Henley and Elizabeth "Betsey" Dodd - but she is my ancestor. If you saw the 1820 census in Franklin Co. VA you would find Betsey Hendley with 2 daughters and her sons. The daughters were Miriam and Malinda. On the 1830 Franklin Co. VA census Malinda and her husband Thomas P. Hall have 2 females under 10. Thomas P. Hall/Malinda Henley were married by 1828 in VA (haven't found the record yet). They moved to Kanawha Co. VA/WV along with her brother Larkin who married Mary (Polly) Whitlock there in 1844 (Polly's parents moved there from Franklin Co. VA also). He was a Blacksmith. In 1880 he was a border with another family. Polly seems to have died before the 1860 census there. They had 4 daughters. Thomas P. Hall and Malinda are credited with 16 children!! Malinda was a twin to Jubal Henley born in 1811. (If they had that many, there must have been some twins). She died in 1890 in Buffalo, Putnam Co. WV. Their daughter Sarah Jane is my direct ancestor. Which of the Henley children are you descended from? In spite of all my efforts I have been unable to learn who the parents are of James B. Henley. Extended research in Franklin Co. VA where he/Elizabeth married in 1804 and she has been unable to locate any records on the Henley/Hendley/Handlay families in Franklin Co. VA.

Seeking information on family of John Dodd and Sarah Poteet, Franklin Co. VA and daughter Elizabeth who married James B. Henley June 1804 Franklin Co. VA.

Seeking information on the children of John Hall and Prudence Poteet. James Poteet her father sold land to John's father Nathan ca. 1784 in Henry Co. VA. Two of John's brothers and some Poteets in Franklin Co. VA 1790's. My ancestor Thomas P (Poteet???) Hall born Franklin Co. VA 1804. Is he a son of John Hall and Prudence Poteet?

Malinda Henley b. 1811 Franklin Co. VA is the daughter of James B. Henley and Elizabeth Dodd who were married in Franklin Co. VA in 1804. I agree that she and Thomas P. Hall did not move into Kanawha Co. VA until 1830's. Daughter Mary Elizabeth was born in 1828. A son Joseph Jubal, was born in Franklin Co., in 1832. So, the family was still in Franklin County before the 1830 and 1840 censuses. I am currently researching Thomas P. Hall family as I found him and Malinda on the 1820 census in Franklin Co. VA. The last name has been spelled several ways but I believe "Henley" is correct.

Malinda Hendley and Thomas P. Hall are my ancestors also. I believe Malinda to be Handley vs Hendley - the name was spelled both ways as well as Hanley/Henley. Further, I believe that her parents were Samuel Handley and Sarah Walker Harmon who were in Kanawha Co. (W)VA by 1820 -then Putnam Co. (W)VA where Malinda/Thomas settled by 1850 also. A John Handley/Hendley settled in Kanawha at the same time but he did not have children the correct age to be Malinda's parent - but I believe him to be Samuel's brother.

James B. Henley was gone more than home yet it seems home often enough to make a few children - he never shows up on a census record with any part of the family. I don't know where William Henley was born - I didn't follow the trace on him in Kanawha Co. but I can see if any record there that would help - William is on the 1860 census there at 65 a miller with second wife Sarah and her children. Also on 1860 is a Samuel 34 farmer (probably a son) . Edward 31 farmer (probably another son). I checked the Kanawha Co. Cemetery books I have - William died Apr 21, 1890 at 85 y/o 1 mo 24 days. First wife Catharine died 1857 at 59 y/o. There is a "Woods Family (Henley Family) Cemetery" in Kanawha Co. WV.
I'll see if there is an actual death record and perhaps an obituary on William that might help us. Notes in my file lit Henley's in VA Tax Payers in Henry Co. VA - that is adjacent to Franklin Co. VA - did you check there? Can you? Also William Henley was in Botetourt Co. VA in 1830 - my other ancestors from Botetourt Co. settled in Kanawha Co. about the same time. So this might be William above. I am really interested in the fact that William son of William/Mary Ann married a Miriam? James B. Henley named his eldest daughter Miriam/Mariam! Malinda Henley and Thomas P. Hall married approximately 1828 when their first daughter was born - but I have yet to find the record - probably married in a neighboring county if not NC - she was 15 or 16 years old. Will research this further. Thomas P. Hall and Malinda and their first two daughters appear on the 1830 census in Franklin Co. VA as does her mother "Betsey Hendley" with sons. So sister Miriam was also married by then.

I am also a descendant of James B. Henley - I found your listing on the Hensley genforum wherein you list William Henley as being in Franklin Co. VA personal property tax list in 1790 - and James B. m. there in 1804.

However, there was a William Henley b. VA 1795 married Catherine Davis with children Edward, William, Frances, Woodson, probably a couple more. (He moved to Kanawha Co. VA by the 1840 census - not there in 1830. He is listed with 8 young male children and 2 young female children, himself and his wife). On the 1850 census he is listed with his wife Catherine and the 4 children I listed above. She seems to have died before 2 Sept. 1859 when he married Sarah Anderson Bowman widow of John Bowman in Kanawha Co. VA. The reason I share this is that my ancestor Malinda Henley dau. of James B. Henley and Elizabeth Dodd m. Thomas P. Hall in Franklin Co. VA - they moved to Kanawha Co. VA about the same time as William Henley - Malinda's brother Larkin moved there also! I thought perhaps William and James B. were related and that is why the family moved to Kanawha Co. VA - since James B. seems to have died by then! (Elizabeth is in Carroll Co. VA with her sons at this time.) Is there any information linking them to William /Mary Ann Osborn Henley etc. that we can verify?

Fleming is on the 1850 census Carroll Co. VA with his brother Lewis- Fleming was listed as 16 y/o idiot! I would like to refer you to Romona Best her e-mail is monieb2@msn.com - she writes me - she is descended from James, James, Benjamin Wallace, Osa Georgie, Romona Best - The things that helped me place Malinda Henley to James B./Elizabeth Dodd family was that Malinda named her first son Jubal, a daughter Miriam, etc. - the fact that Larkin lived four doors from Malinda in Kanawha Co. WV and next door to my ancestor Sarah Jane etc. I was putting the family together in Kanawha Co. WV - and then found my way back to Franklin Co. VA. One "clue" I have in my files that I have not followed up on was that there was a "Larkin Henley" as a Fifer in Rev. War from VA. James named a son Larkin so I thought it a clue worth noting. The Fifer's were usually very young.

Family of Thomas P. Hall and Melinda Henley Hall: Jubal Hall d. 5 Jan 1910 Franklin Co. VA. Mary E. Hall Slack d. 1919 Witchers Creek, Kanawha Co. WV. Thomas P. Hall d. 12 Mary 1921 Buffalo, Putnam Co. PA. William Henry Hall d. 5 Oct. 1875 Putnam Co. WV.

Elizabeth Dodd Henley in Carroll Co. VA - lived in home of son in 1860 she was 71 y/o.

John Hall and Prudence Poteet Hall in Patrick Co. VA - John is son of Nathan Hall and Ann Rowe. Believe my ancestor Thomas P. Hall to be son of John and Prudence born ca. 1805 VA married ca. 1825 to Malinda Henley - Patrick Co. VA?

1842 Carroll County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List names the following HALL and HENLEY clans:

  • HALL, Jonathan D.
  • HALL, John
  • HALL, Richard
  • HALL, William E. Esq.
  • HALL, Langford
  • HALL, Thomas
  • HENLY, Jubal
  • HENLY, Lewis
  • HENLY, Larkin
  • HENLY, Jacob

[i] History of Carroll Co., Virginia

BTW: Does anyone know if there is connection to Don Henley from Texas, member of the rock band The Eagles and the Henley family of Virginia? Also for your information there is a Poteet, Texas. I always wondered why I liked their music in my younger years. Did you also know that country artist legend Patsy Cline’s real name was Virginia Hensley from Winchester, Virginia?

Ref:

Jack Childers, Huntington, WV (Andy’s 1st wife’s great nephew)

Lois Jane Hall Downour, 10305 Madison Township Rd., Roseville, OH 43777, ph. (740) 743-9318, fredlois@netpluscom.com

Colson Hall Bldg., Morgantown College, Morgantown, WV

Romona Best, monieb2@msn.com

Rose Mary S. Rudy

Timothy Daugherty, North Carolina

©2005. Teresa Carr. Skyhouse MediaWorks & Mega Grafx Studio.


[i] http://www.ls.net/~newriver/va/carr1842.htm

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Friday, August 14, 2009

Robert Hunt Memorial Shrine at JamestownImage via Wikipedia

The Jamestown Anniversary: It’s Significance After 400 Years

By Teresa Carr

This year on the 26th of April 2007 was the 400th anniversary of the landing at Jamestown in 1607 when a group of men of the Virginia Company and vicar Robert Hunt planted a cross on the shores of Cape Henry. Captain Christopher Newport commanded the fleet of the Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery carrying 100 men and 4 boys. In America today, the purpose and reason for us being a successful and strong nation is slowly being eradicated because of the lack of knowledge of divine authority in our government, business and homes. Our heritage has been removed from the U.S. History books and brainwashed our children into a Godless society. In spite of the fact of what we have done to our society does not the reflect the true character of our ancient roots and our forefathers that came to this continent 400 years ago to seek freedom of liberty and freedom of Christian religion. The only remains of the Jamestown settlement are the ruins of the Old Church Tower and the reconstructed church on the stone foundation built by the colonists that marks the site of the first permanent English settlement in America.

America is a miracle just as the state of Israel is a miracle. Nowhere in history has any other nation like Israel was the people dispersed over all the earth and centuries later gathered together again as a nation in the Middle East. Israel’s enemies said it would not last a day. It has survived since 1948! The same with America it began with a small group of believers and through enemies, tribulation and hardships we are still thriving by the grace of a loving God and His Son, Jesus Christ our Lord. Christian Americans today are faced with the same problems but on a different scale than our ancestors had in an untamed land. Ours is like confronting a giant Beast that is swallowing up our culture and beliefs into a conglomerate Babylon.

The 2007 celebration brought many people of races and cultures together to commemorate the beginnings a nation by God’s grace and marvelous wonders. Back in 1957 before the 350th celebration the Parks Commission built an exact reproduction of the original town about a half-mile from the original site. Here is where the 400th anniversary met fifty years later.

REF:

History of Virginia. Jamestown. 1968 edition.

©2007. Teresa Carr. Skyhouse MediaWorks & Mega Grafx Studio.
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The History of Jamestown, Virginia

Jamestown Site 7Image by Ken Lund via Flickr

The History of Jamestown, Virginia

Jamestown, VA was the first permanent English settlement in America. On April 26, 1607, three ships stopped at Cape Henry, at the southern entrance to Chesapeake Bay, after more than four months at sea. Captain Christopher Newport commanded this fleet, which was made up of the ships Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery. Colonists on the ships saw “faire meddowes and goodly tall trees” along the Virginia coast. The colonists consisted of 100 men and 4 boys. They had been sent out by a group of London merchants known as the London Company. These men came to America to search for treasure, to spread the Christian faith among the Indians, and to raise farm products that England could not grow at home. Only a few of the men were able or willing to do manual labor.

The three ships sailed up the James River from Cape Henry for about 60 miles. The colonists landed on a little peninsula on the river on May 14, 1607, and established their settlement there. They named both the river and their settlement in honor of King James I of England. The site of the colony turned out to be a bad choice. The ground was swampy, and the drinking water was impure. A meager and unwholesome diet weakened the men, and about two-thirds of them soon died of malnutrition, malaria, pneumonia, and dysentery. To further complicate their problems, they had not expected the sharp contrasts of climate.

The Jamestown settlement suffered one dreadful disaster after another. Captain John Smith held the colony together when he took control from mid-1608 to mid-1609. He forced the settlers to work, and bought corn from the Indians. But an accident in 1609 forced Smith to return to England for treatment for his wounds. Fire, drought, Indian attacks, disease, starvation, and lack of another strong leader brought the colony to its lowest ebb in the winter of 1609. The colonists later called that winter “the starving time.” The arrival of Governor Thomas West, Lord de la Warr, in 1610 with new settlers and fresh supplies saved Jamestown from abandonment. The settlement could not have survived without the strong and intelligent leadership of Captain John Smith and Lord de la Warr.

About 18,000 Indians lived in Virginia during the early 1600’s. More than 30 of the tribes in the area united to form a confederacy under the mighty chief Powhatan (Wahunsonacock). His daughter, the Indian princess Pocahontas, was reported to have saved the life of Captain John Rolfe, one of the colonists. This marriage brought about eight years of peace between the settlers and the Indians, and temporarily overcame the menace of hostile raids.

The agricultural and industrial activities of the colony got off to a slow start at first. The colonists made unsuccessful attempts to produce silk, grapes, and other items that were unsuited for the Virginia climate. Early industries included glass blowing, iron smelting, the making of potash, and shipbuilding. The first farm products to be raised successfully were hogs and Indian corn. In 1612, John Rolfe introduced a new type of tobacco to the colony by bringing seed from the method of curing the leaves. This new kind of tobacco was sweeter than the native Virginia plant, and the settlers found a ready market for it in Europe. Tobacco, together with corn, and hogs, provided a solid basis for Jamestown’s economy.

The year 1619 was important in the history of the Jamestown colony. The first representative legislative assembly in the Western Hemisphere met in the town that year. This assembly, called the House of Burgesses, served as the model for many of the law-making bodies throughout the United States. Before 1619, only a few married women and female servants lived in Jamestown. In 1619, when the population was about a thousand, the London Company tried to encourage young men to make permanent homes in the colony by sending a number of “young, handsome and honestly educated maids” to become the bachelors’ wives. Another important event of 1619 was the arrival from Africa of a Dutch ship at Jamestown with 20 Negroes. These Negroes, and the many who followed them, had much to do with making the colony a prosperous one.

In 1622, the Indians broke the peace, which had lasted since 1614. They unexpectedly attacked the settlements around Jamestown, and killed about 350 of the colonists. The town itself received a warning of the Indian uprising, and was able to resist the attack. The red men rose again in 1644 and killed about 50 people, mostly in outlying settlements. Both times, the colonists struck back with vengeance, destroying the Indians’ food supplies.

Two of the most important reasons for the success of the Jamestown settlement were that (1) the colonists learned to produce their own food, and (2) family life developed after women settled in the colony.

Ill luck overtook Jamestown in the late 1600’s. The town was burned to the ground in 1676 during the Bacon’s Rebellion, a revolt against the royal governor led by planter Nathaniel Bacon. Fire again destroyed the settlement in 1698. These disasters caused the people in Virginia to transfer their capital to Williamsburg in 1699, rather than again rebuild Jamestown. The town of Jamestown itself fell into decay after that time.

The site of the Jamestown settlement no longer stands on a peninsula. It lies on an island, having been cut off from the mainland by water. Tidal currents have washed much of the original land away. For many years, only a few foundation stones and the ruined tower of a brick church stood as reminders of the settlement. The church itself was reconstructed on the stones of the foundation laid by the hardy colonists. The Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities controls the land around the ruined church, and the National Park Service owns the rest of the area. The National Park Service operates its part of Jamestown as part of the Colonial National Historical Park.

In 1957, Virginia celebrated the 350th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown. The National Park Service and the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities built an exact reproduction of the original town about one-half mile from the original site. Archaeologists have discovered many relics of the original town. The restored town of Jamestown draws thousands of tourists each year.

Related Notable People, Places, and Events

Bacon’s Rebellion

London Company

John Smith

Glass, Early American

Pocahontas

Virginia, Early History

House of Burgesses

John Rolfe

Williamsburg

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